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Clinical Research

Bringing Discoveries to the "Bedside"

Dr. Roberta Woodgate

Dr. Roberta Woodgate

Principal Investigator
Psychosocial Oncology and Cancer Nursing Research

Professor
Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba

Manitoba Research Chair: Child and Youth Health and Illness

CIHR/NCIC Research Scientist

Research Scientist for the Manitoba Institute of Child Health

Research Focus

The overall aim of Dr. Roberta Woodgate’s research program is directed at understanding and improving the quality of health and quality of health care in children of all ages and their families. She has built a strong program of research on families and children/youth with chronic and life-threatening illnesses and childhood disability. A major focus of her research program is on the psychosocial aspects of childhood cancer across the continuum of cancer prevention, cancer care and/or palliative care. Currently she is conducting a study that seeks to understand how children communicate their symptom experiences and suffering through the concept of feeling states, and includes developing a computer video-game approach for self-assessment and management of symptom experiences by children with cancer. She is also an emerging leader in the study of the ethics of child/youth health research. She has funding for two projects in this area. The first project is examining parents’ and children’s decisions and experiences in childhood cancer clinical trials. The second project is exploring research ethics board members, child health researchers and families’ perceptions of risks to involving children in research. As PI, she is also pursuing research that promotes healthy lifestyles in youth. This includes two funded research studies that focus on how youth frame health and cancer prevention within the context of their life-situations.

Why is this work important?

Research on children (including adolescents) is challenging and demands both scientific rigor and humanistic sensitivity. A natural inclination is to protect children (especially those who are ill) but in protection, one may neglect to ask the questions that will empower children to understand and explain their illness and health experience and their needs to caregivers. Dr. Woodgate’s research provides children of all ages the opportunity to explain how they perceive their illness and health experiences and what illness and health means to them in the context of their own life situations. The information emerging from Dr. Woodgate’s work challenges existing notions of how children experience illness and health. Her work has contributed to the scientific and practice communities and has improved the care experiences of families and children within the health care system. As well, her work on the ethics of child health research will help develop and improve policies to guide research ethic boards, researchers and families in involving children in research.

About Dr. Roberta L Woodgate

Dr. Roberta L. Woodgate is a Professor in the Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba. She has a cross appointment in the Faculty of Medicine for The Department of Pediatrics and Child Health (University of Manitoba) and a scientist appointment with the Manitoba Institute of Child Health. The overall objective of Dr. Woodgate’s research program is directed at understanding and improving children’s quality of life and health care, as well as advancing the ethics of child health research. The importance of her overall research program has been recognized through her receiving a Manitoba Health Research Council Establishment Award (2003-2006), a Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) Research Scientist Award (accepted) in 2004, and CIHR New Investigator Award (declined in lieu of the CCS award). In 2005 she was given an Rh award for outstanding contributions to scholarship and research in the interdisciplinary category from the Winnipeg Rh Institute Foundation Inc which is a significant career distinction. To date, Dr. Woodgate has received over a million dollars in research funding. She has disseminated research findings to clinical and scientific audiences (over 50 peer reviewed publications, over 80 conference and scholarly presentations) at the local, national and international levels. At the official launch of the Centennial Year of the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) in Toronto on February 1, 2008, Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Health Minister Tony Clement recognized 14 extraordinary and diverse nurse leaders from across Canada for their contributions to the health system and the health of Canadians. Dr. Woodgate was the nurse from Manitoba who received the prestigious award. Dr. Woodgate is also a research scientist with the Manitoba Institute of Child Health and provides expert research advice to pediatric nurses. To date, Dr. Woodgate has received over a million dollars in research funding. She has disseminated research findings to clinical and scientific audiences (over 50 peer reviewed publications, over 80 conference and scholarly presentations) at the local, national and international levels.

For more information, please contact:

Dr. Roberta Woodgate
Faculty of Nursing
University of Manitoba
Room 465, Helen Glass Centre for Nursing
Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N2
Tel. (204) 474-8338
Fax. (204) 474-7682
E-mail. Roberta_Woodgate@umanitoba.ca

In Detail

Dr. Roberta Woodgate is currently conducting the following research studies:

1. Project Title: Development and Testing of a Computer Video-Game Approach Designed for Self-Assessment and Management of Meaning-Centred Symptom Experiences by Children with Cancer

Principal Investigator (PI): Roberta L Woodgate
Co-Investigators: Dr. P. Irani, Dr. C. Watters, Dr. R. A Yanofsky, Dr. L Degner, Christina West)
Funding: Canadian Institutes of Health Research Operating Grant. Amount of Funding: $132,888.00 per year from 2006 – 2010.

Abstract: The overall purpose of this 3-phase study is to develop and test a new and innovative approach to self-assessment and management of symptoms for children with cancer. This purpose is being achieved by means of adopting the feeling state (meaning-centred symptom) model to symptom self-assessment and through the creative delivery format of an interactive computer video-game. The objectives of the study are: 1) To validate the feeling state (meaning-centred symptom) model with attention to identifying coping strategies used by children to deal with their cancer symptom experiences. 2) To develop and pilot test an interactive computer video-game based on the key symptom experiences. 3) To test the computer video-game approach for self-assessment of meaning-centred symptom experiences by children with cancer and evaluate this approach on the symptom experiences and quality of life in children undergoing cancer treatment. Findings from this 3-phase study will form the basis for future clinical trials aimed at testing interventions to manage symptoms and to promote quality of life outcomes for children with cancer and their families. Future work may reveal that the video-game format as a means of assessing symptoms has merit beyond pediatric oncology.

2. Project Title: Perceptions and Assessment of the Risks to Involving Children in Research: Perspectives of Research Ethics Board Members (REBs), Child Health Researchers, and Parents

Principal Investigator (PI): Roberta L Woodgate
Co-Investigators: Dr. R. Dean, Dr. M. Edward, C. Shapiro, Dr. K. Grant, K., Dr. B. Cham
Funding: Canadian Institutes of Health Research Operating Grant-RFA
Amount of Funding: $92,095.00 per year for three years plus $4,250.00 in equipment, 2005 – 2008

Abstract: The overall purpose of this qualitative research study is to arrive at an increased understanding of how Research Ethics Board (REB) members, child health researchers, parents, and children perceive and assess the risks to involving children in research. Critical to arriving at a detailed and accurate understanding of participants’ perspectives is a solid foundation in descriptive theory. Accordingly, this study employs the qualitative research design of grounded theory. Data is being collected by means of open-ended, person-centred individual interviews involving all participants. Secondary data is being gathered from across Canadian REBs’ policies/regulations in order to make the analysis more meaningful to REBs in Canada. Data is being analyzed using the constant comparative technique. This study will result in foundational knowledge that may be used to develop and refine standards and to establish and better the normative basis for allowing children to participate in research. The model of risk emerging from this study will be used to guide and support the work of researchers and REBs to improve the protection of children who participate in research.

3. Project Title: An ethnographic study of adolescents’ conceptualization of cancer and cancer prevention: Framing cancer and cancer prevention within the life-situations of adolescents.
PI: Roberta L Woodgate
Co-Investigators: Dr. J. Halas, Dr. A. Schultz
Funding: Canadian Institutes of Health Research Operating Grant, $84,373.00, 2007 – 2008; and Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) – Manitoba Regional Partnership Program (RPP), $85,828.00, 2008 – 2009.

Abstract: The primary purpose of this study is to extend our limited understanding of how adolescents frame cancer and cancer prevention within the context of their own life-situations. The knowledge gleaned from this study will be used to inform and guide future cancer prevention programming so that strategies are more meaningful and relevant to adolescents. The three research objectives of this qualitative research study are: 1) To explore adolescents’ perspectives and beliefs about cancer and cancer prevention in the context of their own life-situations; 2) To explore adolescents’ perspectives and beliefs that affect health especially with respect to preventing cancer; and 3) To explore what adolescents feel they and others (e.g., governments, health professionals, parents, teachers) could be doing to address the behavioural, environmental, and social-cultural determinants of cancer. The primary key participants are adolescents ranging in age from 12-17 years. Open-ended, person-centred interviews and photovoice are the primary data collection methods. There are several levels of analysis including domain, taxonomic, and componential analysis with the aim of analysis is to strive for a detailed account of the domains of meaning relevant to adolescents’ perspectives of cancer and cancer prevention and social-cultural themes that represent a holistic view of how adolescents frame cancer and cancer prevention within the context of their own lives. Findings from this study will be used to guide future policy and program development focused on cancer prevention in adolescents.

4. Project Title: Youth speaking for themselves about health within their own life-situations: An ethnographic study of youth’s perspectives of health and their own health interests.
PI: Roberta L Woodgate
Funding: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Research Grant
Amount of Funding: $60,000.00 for three years, 2007 – 2010

Abstract: The purpose of this qualitative study is to extend our limited understanding of how youth frame health within the context of their life-situations. Research questions include: How do youth define health?; What does it mean to youth to be healthy?; What do youth think and feel about how their own life-situations impact on their ability to affect their health?; and What are the health interests of youth? To answer these questions the qualitative research design of ethnography is being used to afford youth the opportunity to share their perspectives from their own frames of reference and experiences of reality. The primary key participants are adolescents ranging in age from 12-17 years. Open-ended, person-centred interviews and photovoice are the primary data collection methods. Combining interviews with photovoice is an innovative approach that affords a visual image of the insider’s viewpoint, at a specific moment in time, and can give meaning to experiences that are often difficult to express with language. Data analysis will involve four levels of analysis that result in domains of meaning relevant to the youth’s perspectives of health and social-cultural themes that represent a holistic view of how youth frame health within their own life-situations. This study will result in foundational social-cultural knowledge specific to youth’s perspectives of health that goes beyond a biomedical understanding of what health means to youth.

5. Project Title: Parents’ and Children’s Decisions and Experiences in Childhood Cancer Clinical Trial
PI: Roberta L Woodgate
Co-Investigators: Dr. R. Yanofsky, Dr. J. Sloan
Funding: Canadian Institutes of Health Research Operating Grant
Amount of Funding: $49,428.00 for three years, 2004 – 2007

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to arrive at a detailed, in-depth understanding of Canadian parents’ and children’s perspectives of participating in childhood cancer clinical research. A qualitative interpretive research design was used. This approach fostered the discovery of new insights, meaningful descriptions, and detailed understanding of the perspectives from 30 families of children with cancer. Open-ended interviews were the main source of data collection. Data was analyzed by the constant comparative method of data analysis. Findings from this study indicate that parents of children with cancer need more support in making and living with the decisions they make specific to involving their ill child in research. Recommendations are provided with attention to strategies that foster positive verbal communication and improving relational processes between parents and members of the health care team.

6. Project Title: Unravelling the Disability Trajectory of First Nations Families of Children with Disabilities: Advancing Jordan’s Principle
PI: Roberta L Woodgate
Co-Investigators: J. Ripat, B. Borton, G. Rempel, B. Elias, et al.
Funding: Canadian Institutes of Health Research Emerging Team Grant: Children with Disabilities (ETG: CWD) (Bright Futures for Kids with Disabilities)
Amount of Funding: $10,000.00 for one year, 2008-2009

Abstract: Advances in chronic and genetic disease management and health care technology have increased the longevity of children with complex medical needs and disabilities. Although research is beginning to address the impact that disabilities have on Canadian children and their families, sorely missing is an understanding of the experiences of First Nations families of children with disabilities. The purpose of this team grant is to provide a detailed understanding of the disability trajectory from the perspectives of First Nations families of children with disabilities. This team grant affords the opportunity to study the childhood disability in First Nations families from multiple lenses and within a comprehensive developmental and social-ecological model. The knowledge emerging from this work will be used to develop and refine service pathways and standards of care that will improve the involvement and care of First Nations families of children with disabilities. In the end, we seek to advance Jordan’s principle by developing service pathways and standards that put the child first.

EMPIRICALLY BASED ARTICLES (PUBLISHED OR IN PRESS):

Ripat, J. & Woodgate, R. L. (In Press). Self-perceived participation among adults with spinal cord injury: A grounded theory study. Spinal Cord.

Ripat, J. & Woodgate, R. L. (In Press). The role of assistive technology in self-perceived participation. International Journal of Rehabilitation Research.

Campbell-Enns, H. & Woodgate, R. L. (In Press). Young men with cancer: A literature review. Cancer Nursing.

Hoogsteen, L. & Woodgate, R. L. (In Press). Playing the Autism Card: The Lived Experience of Parenting a Child with Autism, Pediatric Nursing, In Press.

Wilkins, K. & Woodgate, R. L. (2012). Taking care of second cancer risk. Cancer Nursing, 35(1), 55-62.

Ripat, J. & Woodgate, R. L. (2011). Locating assistive technology within an emancipatory disability research framework. Technology and Disability, 23, 87–92.

Wilkins, K. & Woodgate, R. (2011). Life after Cancer: Living with risk. Cancer Nursing, 34(6), 487-494.

Watt-Shepherd, E. & Woodgate, R. L. (2011). A Journey within a Journey: The lived experience of parents who do not live near their child’s tertiary cancer centre. Submitted to the Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 28(4), 231-243.

Ripat, J. & Woodgate, R. L. (2011). The intersection of culture, disability, and assistive technology. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 6(2), 87–96.

Cox, S., Ross, K., Townsend, A. Avard, D. & Woodgate, R. L. (2011), From Stakeholders to shareholders: Engaging consumers in health research. Health Law Review, 19(3), 63-71.

Hoogsteen, L. & Woodgate, R. L. (2010) Can I play? A concept analysis of participation in children with disabilities. Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 30(4), 325-339.

Woodgate, R. L. Edwards, M. (2010). Children in health research: A matter of trust. Journal of Medical Ethics,36(4),211-216.

Woodgate, R. L. & Leach, J. (2010). Youth’s perspectives on the determinants of health. Qualitative Health Research, 20(9),1173-1182.

Watt-Shepherd*, E. & Woodgate, R. L. Cancer survivorship in children and young adults: A concept analysis. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 27(2) 109–118. * 2010 Dianne Fochtman New Author Award, Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses winner

Watt-Shepherd, E., Woodgate, R. L. & Sawatzky, J. (2010). Pain in children with central nervous system cancer: A human response to illness. Oncology Nursing Forum, 37(4):E318-30.

Woodgate, R. L. & Yanofsky, R. (2010). Parents’ experiences with childhood cancer clinical trials. Cancer Nursing,33(1),11-18.

Briscoe, W. & Woodgate, R. L. (2010). Sustaining Self: The lived experience of transition to long-term ventilator utilization. Qualitative Health Research, 20(1), 57-67.

Woodgate, R. L. (2009).The experience of dyspnea in school-age children with asthma. MCN: The American Journal of Maternal Child, 34(3), 154-163.*Marked as a Continuing Education (CE) article
Woodgate, R. L. & Leach, J. (2009). Making it work: Challenges and strategies to engaging youth in qualitative research. International Journal of Qualitative Methods, 8(3). 8.
Woodgate, R. L. (2009).Challenges and the importance of sustaining a mindful presence when engaging children with cancer in the qualitative research process. International Journal of Qualitative Methods, 8(3), 2.
Cox, S., Townsend, A., Preto, N., Woodgate, R. L., & Kolopack, P. (2009). Ethical challenges and evolving practices in research on ethics in health research. Health Law Review, 17:2-3, 33-39.

Owen, M., Emerson, C., Kolopack, P., Preto, N., Sampson, H., Townsend, A., Willison, D. & Woodgate, R. L. (2009). Informing governance through evidence-based research on REBs: Challenges and opportunities. Health Law Review, 17:2-3, 40- 46.

Avard, D., Stanton- Jean, M., Woodgate, R. L., Pullman, D., & Saginur, R. (2009). Research ethics board and challenges for public participation. Health Law Review, 17:2-3, 66-72.

Savard, J. & Woodgate, R. L. (2009).Young Peoples’ Lived Experience of Living with IBD and an Ostomy. Gastroenterology Nursing, 32(1), 33-41.

Reisnch, S. & Woodgate, R. (2008). Understanding the cultural meanings of farm women’s Stress Experiences in Canada, Journal of Rural Community Psychology, E10 (2).

Wilkins, K. & Woodgate, R. L. (2008). Preventing second cancers in cancer survivors.
Oncology Nursing Forum, 35(2), E12-E22.

Woodgate, R. L., Ateah, C., & Secco, L. (2008). Living in a world of our own: The experience of parents who have a child with autism. Qualitative Health Research, 18(8), 1075-1083.

Woodgate, R. L. (2008). Feeling States: A new approach to understanding how children with cancer experience symptoms. Cancer Nursing, 31(3), 229-238.

Wilkins, K. & Woodgate, R. L. (2008). Designing a mixed methods study in pediatric oncology nursing research. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 25, 34-43.

Mossman Sims, R. & Woodgate, R. L. (2008). Managing chronic hepatitis B in children. Journal of Pediatric Health Care, 22(6), 360-367.

Wilkins, K. & Woodgate, R. L. (2007). Supporting siblings through the pediatric bone marrow transplant (BMT) trajectory: Perspectives of siblings of BMT recipients. Cancer Nursing, 30(5), E29-E34.

Wilkins, K. & Woodgate, R. L. (2007). An interruption in family life: Siblings’ lived experience as they transition through the pediatric bone marrow transplant (BMT) trajectory. Oncology Nursing Forum, 34(2), E28-E35. *DeWiele-Topshee Award for Research Excellence in the Field of Oncology ($1,500.00)

Heaman, M., Chalmers, K., Woodgate, R. L., Brown, J., & Betker, C. (2007). Relationship work in an early childhood home visiting program. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 22(4), 319-330.

Woodgate, R. L., Heaman, M., Chalmers, K., & Brown, J. (2007). Issues and challenges in delivering an early childhood home visiting program using lay home visitors. MCN: The American Journal of Maternal Child, 32(2), 95-101.

Wilkins, K. L. & Woodgate, R. L. (2007). State of the science on the second cancer experience in survivors of childhood and adult cancers. Oncology Nursing Forum, 34(1), 200.

Woodgate, R. L. (2006). Siblings’ Experiences with childhood cancer: A different way of being in the family. Cancer Nursing, 29(5), 406-414.*Medscape Profile, Posted 02/21/2007, Medscape is the leading online provider of medical professional information and continued medical education. *Featured in Chapter 4, Evidence-Based Practice Box, in Health Promotion Strategies Through the Lifespan, 2CE by Murray, Zentner/Pangman/Pangman.

Woodgate, R. L. (2006). Living in the shadow of fear: Adolescents’ experience of depression. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 56(3), 261-269.

Gillespie, C., Woodgate, R. L., Chalmers, K., & Watson, W. (2007). “Living with risk”: Mothering a child with food induced anaphylaxis. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 22(1), 30-42.

Secco, L., Woodgate, R. L., Hodgson, A., Kowalski, S., Plouffe, J., Rothney, P. R., Sawatzky-Dickson, D., & Suderman, E. (2006). A survey study of pediatric nurses’ use of information sources. CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing, 24(2), 105-112.

Heaman, M., Chalmers, K., Woodgate, R. L., Brown, J. (2006). Early childhood home visiting programme: Factors contributing to success. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 55(3), 291-300.

Woodgate, R. L. (2006). Living in a world without closure: Reality for parents who have experienced the death of a child. Journal of Palliative Care, 22(2), 75-82.*Featured in MCN: The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing, (2007), 32(5), 324, Toward Evidenced-Based section.

Woodgate, R. L. (2006). The importance of ‘being there’: Perspectives of supportive relationships by adolescents. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 23(3), 122-134. *Clinical education units (CEU) offering.

Woodgate, R. L. (2006). Life is never the same: Childhood cancer narratives. European Journal of Cancer Care, 15, 8-18.

Wilkins, K., & Woodgate, R. L. (2006). Transition: A conceptual analysis in the context of siblings of children with cancer. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 21(4), 256-265.

Wilkins, K., & Woodgate, R. L. (2005). A review of qualitative research on the childhood cancer experience from the perspective of siblings: A need to give them a voice. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 22(6), 305–319.

Woodgate, R. L. (2005). “Closure: Who is it for?” Journal of Palliative Care, 21(3), 200.

Woodgate, R. L., Clarke, J., Gibson, F., Hallströöm, I., Kline, N., Monterosso, L., von Essen. L., & Wettergren, L. (2005). Development of an international pediatric oncology research network: Setting the stage for international collaborative psychosocial-behavioral research. Pediatric Blood and Cancer, 45(4), 400.

Woodgate, R. L. (2005). The childhood cancer experience of healthy siblings. Pediatric Blood and Cancer, 45(4), 538.

Woodgate, R. L. (2005). A different way of being in adolescents with cancer. Pediatric Blood and Cancer, 45(4), 538.

Wilkins, K., Woodgate, R. L., Degner, L., & Schroeder, M. (2005). Siblings of pediatric bone marrow transplant recipients: Their lived experience as they transition through the bone marrow transplant trajectory. Pediatric Blood and Cancer, 45(4), 424.

Woodgate, R. L. (2005). A different way of being: Adolescents’ experiences with cancer. Cancer Nursing 28(1), 8-15. *Featured in Medscape Profile, for peer-reviewed paper.

Woodgate, R. L. (2004). Coping in children with cancer. Pediatric Blood and Cancer, 43(4), 308.

Woodgate, R. L. & Degner, L. (2004). Cancer-symptom transition periods of children with cancer and their families. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 46(4), 358-368.

Woodgate, R. L. (2003). Les enfants atteints du cancer et leur vécu des symptômes de la maladie: Le soutien spirituel aux enfants et à leur famille. Canadian Oncology Nursing Journal, 13(4), 232-241.

Kristjanson, L., Chalmers, K., & Woodgate, R. (2004). Information and support needs of adolescent children of women with breast cancer. Oncology Nursing Forum, 31(1), 111-119.

Woodgate, R. L., Degner, L., & Yanofsky, R. (2003). A different perspective to approaching cancer-symptoms in children. The Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 26(3), 800-817.

Woodgate, R. L. (2003). Children’s cancer-symptom experiences: Keeping the spirit alive in children and their families. Canadian Oncology Nursing Journal, 13(3), 142-150.

Woodgate, R. L. & Degner, L. F. (2003). A substantive theory of keeping the spirit alive: The spirit within children with cancer and their families. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 20(3), 103-119.

Woodgate, R. L., & Degner, L. F. (2003). Expectations and beliefs about children’s cancer symptoms: Perspectives of children with cancer and their families. Oncology Nursing Forum, 30(3), 479-491.

Ateah, C., Secco, L., & Woodgate, R. (2003). The risks and alternatives to physical punishment use with children. Journal of Pediatric Health Care, 17(3), 126-132.

Woodgate, R. L. & Degner, L. (2002). “Nothing is carved in stone!”: Uncertainty in children with cancer and their families. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 6(4), 191-202.

Secco, L., Ateah, C., Woodgate, R., & Moffat, M. (2002). Perceived and performed infant care competence of younger and older adolescents. Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing, 25(2), 97-112.

Woodgate, R. (2001). Adopting the qualitative paradigm to understanding young children’s perspectives of illness: Barrier or facilitator? Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 1 (3), 149-162

Woodgate, R. (2000). Part I: An introduction to conducting qualitative research in children with cancer. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 17(4), 192-206.

Woodgate, R. (2000). Part II: A critical review of qualitative research related to children’s experiences with cancer. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 17(4), 207-228.

Chalmers, K., Kristjanson, L., Woodgate, R., Taylor-Brown, J., Nelson, F., Ramserran, S., & Dudgeon, D. (2000). Adolescent children of women with breast cancer: Their perspectives of the role of the school in providing information and support. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 31(6), 1430-1438.

Woodgate, R. (1999). Social support in children with cancer: A critical review of literature. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 16(4), 201-213.

Woodgate, R. (1999). Part II: A critical review of the literature of resilience in the adolescent cancer experience. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 16 (2), 78-89.

Woodgate, R. (1999). Conceptual understanding of resilience in the adolescent with cancer: Part I. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 16(1), 35-43.

Woodgate, R. (1998). Adolescents’ perspectives of chronic illness: “It’s hard”. Journal of Pediatric Nursing. 13(4), 210-223.

McClement, S., & Woodgate, R. (1998). Research with families in palliative care: Conceptual and methodological challenges. European Journal of Cancer Care,7, 247-254.

Woodgate, R. (1998). Health professionals caring for chronically ill adolescents: Adolescents’ Perspectives. Journal of the Society of Pediatric Nurses, 3(2), 57-68.

Woodgate, R. & McClement, S. (1998). Symptom distress in children with cancer: The need to adopt a meaning-centred approach. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 15(1), 3-12.

McClement, S., & Woodgate, R. (1997).The care of the cachectic terminally ill cancer patient: The interface between nursing and anthropology: European Journal of Cancer Care, 6, 295-303.

McClement, S., Woodgate R., & Degner, L. (1997). Symptom distress in adult patients with cancer. Cancer Nursing, 20(4), 236-243.

Woodgate, R. & McClement, S. (1997). Sense of self in children with cancer and childhood cancer survivors: A critical review. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 14(3), 137-155.

Woodgate, R. & Kristjanson, L. (1996). “My hurts”: Hospitalized young children’s perceptions of acute pain. Qualitative Health Research, 6(2), 184-201.

Woodgate, R. & Kristjanson, L. (1996). “Getting better from my hurts”: A model of the young child’s pain experience. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 11(4), 233-242.

Woodgate, R. & Kristjanson, L. (1996). A young child’s pain: How parents and nurses “take care”. International Journal of Nursing Research, 33(3), 271-284.

Woodgate, R. & Kristjanson, L. (1995). Young children’s behavioural responses to acute pain: Strategies for “Getting Better”. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 22, 243-249.

REPORTS:

Woodgate, R. L. & Payne, M. (2011). Positive youth and the Manitoba HIV ProgramProject . Pilot project undertaken by Nine Circles Community Health Centre and the Manitoba HIV Program, in partnership with the University of Manitoba, Faculty of Nursing and the Prairie Community-Based HIV Research Program. Sponsored by the AIDS Community Action Program (ACAP).

Chalmers, K., Heaman, M., Woodgate, R. L., & Brown, J. (2004). Interpretative Evaluation of the Baby First Program. Sponsored by the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority.

Evidence-Based White Paper (invited): Woodgate, R. L. (November 2003-2004). Psychosocial Issues of Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults with Cancer. Invited by the National Institute of Cancer (NIC) to prepare an evidence-based paper that will be used as the template for NIC’s Youth and Cancer Education Series. (Declined due to contractual reasons)

CHAPTERS IN BOOKS:

Woodgate, R. L. (In Press). Nursing Care of the Child with a Neoplastic Disorder (Chapter 29). In C. Ateah and S. Scott (Eds.), Essentials of Pediatric Nursing (Canadian Adaptation of Kyle 1e).

Woodgate, R. L., West, C., & Wilkin, K. (2011). Family-centered psychosocial care. In C. Baggott, D. Fochtman, G. Foley, and K. Kelly (Eds.), Nursing Care of Children and Adolescents with Cancer and Blood Disorders (4th ed.) (pp. 114-164). Glenview, Illinois: Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses (APHON).

Woodgate, R. L. (2008). Getting on with Life. In D. Kelly and F. Gibson (Eds.), Cancer Care in Adolescents and Young Adults (pp. 130-146). Publishers, Blackwell Sciences.

Gillespie, C., Woodgate, R. L., Chalmers, K., & Watson, W. Living with risk: Mothering a child with food-induced anaphylaxis. To be featured in the upcoming 7th edition of Essentials of Nursing Research (co-authored by Denise Polit and Cheryl Beck) and in the 3rd edition of Canadian Essentials of Nursing Research. The manuscript was chosen as exemplar of a qualitative study. Note: This manuscript was originally published in Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 22(1), 30-42.

Woodgate, R. L. (2007). A different way of being: Adolescents’ experiences with cancer. Featured in the 2nd edition of Canadian Essentials of Nursing Research (co-authored by Carmen Loiselle and Joanne Profetto-McGrath). The manuscript was chosen as exemplar of a qualitative study. Note: This manuscript was originally published in Cancer Nursing, 28(1), 8-15.

Woodgate, R. & Chernick, V. (2001). The professional caregivers’ perspective. In M. Bluebond-Langner, B. Lask, & D. Angst (Eds.), Psychosocial Aspects of Cystic Fibrosis, (pp. 86-94). London, England: Arnold.


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2011 Qualitative Research Group (QRG) Annual Faculty Award, University of Manitoba

2010-2015 Manitoba Research Chair Award. Awarded by the Manitoba Health Research Council. Awarded for the period of July 1, 2009-June 30, 2015, $100,000.00/year for five years.

2009 2009 MCN: The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing’s Best Research Paper, for the paper: Woodgate, R. L. The experience of dyspnea in school-age children with asthma. MCN: The American Journal of Maternal Child, 34(3), 154-163.

2009 YMCA-YWCA of Winnipeg Women of Distinction Awards Nomination for outstanding achievement in the category of Research and Innovation.

2008 Canadian Association of Nursing Research (CANR) Nurse Researcher Award

2008 Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) Nurse to Know Centennial Achievement Award

2007 College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba (CRNM) Professional Nursing Award: Excellence in Professional Nursing in recognition of her contribution to research and scholarship.

2006 Graduate Nurses Association Teaching Excellence of Award, University of Manitoba

2006 Shastri Indo-Canadian Institute Fellow, Invited Scholar to the Human Dimensions of Science and Technology, New Delhi, February 20-22, 2006.

2004 Rh award for outstanding contributions to scholarship and research in the interdisciplinary category from the Winnipeg Rh Institute Foundation Inc., $10,000.00, awarded February 2005.

2004 Dorothy J. Lamont Scientist Award: Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) Research Scientist Award – Highest-ranking scientist in the Behavioral/Psychosocial/Cancer

Control Research Scientist Category, A joint National Cancer Institute of Canada and Canadian Institutes of Health Research Award.

Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) Research Scientist Award: Behavioural/Psychosocial/Cancer Control (BPCC) Research Personnel Award, National Cancer Institute of

Canada, Awarded for the period of July 1, 2004- June 30, 2010. Approximate value $50,000.00/year for six years.

Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) New Investigator Award, Support for the period of July 2004 – July 2009, approximate value $50,000.00/year for five years (declined in lieu of the CCS Research Scientist Award).

Manitoba Health Research Council Establishment Grant, October 2003-2006, $55,578.00

Fellowship: Mayo Clinic-University of Manitoba Quality of Life Winter Institute, co-sponsored by the Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba and the Mayo Clinic,
Rochester, Minnesota, 2003, fully funded.

The Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses Annual Writing Award, given for the most meritorious article by the Association of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, September 2003.

2002 Schering/Cano Lectureship Award, awarded in September 2002 at the 2002 Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology (Cano) Conference

The Pat Scorer Fellowship, awarded by the Medical Advisory Committee and the Executive of the Children’s Hospital Foundation of Manitoba Inc., July 1999 – July 2000, $30,000.00.

National Health and Research Development Program Doctoral Student (NHRDP) Fellowship, September 1995 – July 1999, $19,000.00 per annum.

Dianne Fochtman New Author Award, Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses, September 1997.

Maurice Legault Clinical Cancer Nursing Fellowship, September 1997 – June 1998, $9,000.00.

Manitoba Health Research Council Studentship, awarded in 1995 and 1997, declined in lieu of NHRDP fellowship

Toronto Sick Children’s Hospital Fellowship: Canadian Nurses Doctoral Student Study Award, September 1995, $5,000.00.

Outstanding Qualitative Graduate Thesis Award in Nursing: Manitoba Nursing Research Institute/University of Manitoba, 1994.

Nursing Practice Award, Children’s Hospital: Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, 1993.

University of Manitoba Graduate Student Fellowship, September 1989 – April 1991, $8,000.00 per annum.

Manitoba Association of Registered Nurses Graduate Study Bursary, 1989, $1,200.00.

Woodgate, R. L. Principal Investigator (PI), Altman, G., Walker, J., & Wener, P. Youth’s Voices: Their Lives and Experiences of Living with an Anxiety Disorder. Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). Amount of Funding: $366,010.00, 2012-2015.

Woodgate, R. L. Principal Investigator (PI), Altman, G., Walker, J., & Wener, P. Youth’s Voices: Their Lives and Experiences of Living with an Anxiety Disorder. Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) – Manitoba Regional Partnership Program (RPP) Funding. Amount of Funding: $100,000.00, 2011-2013.

Woodgate, R. L. (PI), Masuda, J., Manchanda, R., & Griffith, E. J. Building youth capacity for heart health promotion: A school-based feasibility study. Heart and Stroke Foundation of Manitoba: Primary Prevention Challenge Grant Program. Amount of Funding: $79,887.00, 2011-2013.

Woodgate, R. L. (PI) & Payne, M. (2011). Positive youth and the Manitoba HIV program project. AIDS Community Action Program (ACAP) resources. Amount of funding: $5,600.00.

Martin, D. & Woodgate, R. L.A family health needs assessment with a First Nations community using critical and indigenous methodologies. Dr. Paul H.T. Thorlakson Foundation Fund. Amount of Funding: $24,063.14, 2010-2011.

Ripat, J. (PI), Woodgate , R.L. (CI), Etcheverry, E., Medved M. Assistive technology and young adults with disabilities. Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) operating grant. Amount of Funding: $119,084.00 (Total), 2009-2011.

Ripat, J. (PI) & Woodgate , R.L. (CI), Young adults with spinal cord injuries, participation, and assistive technology: Manitoba Spinal Cord Injury Research Committee operating grant. Amount of Funding: $45,000.00, 2009-2010.

Loiselle, C. G., Bottorff, J. L., Hack, T. F., Carlson, L. E., Maunsell, E., Howell, D., Oliffe, J., Grunfeld, E. (2009-2015). Psychosocial Oncology Research Training (PORT): A renewal application. Strategic Training Initiative in Health Research (STIHR) CIHR/ICR. $1,950,000.00. This grant includes 23 additional mentors. Woodgate, R. is one of the Port Mentors.

Woodgate, R. L. Principal Investigator (PI), Rempel, G., Ripat, J., Elias, B., Moffat, M., Halas, J., Linton, J., Martin, D. Understanding the Disability Trajectory of First Nations Families of Children with disabilities: Advancing Jordan’s Principle. Canadian Institutes of Health Research Emerging Team Grant: Children with Disabilities (ETG: CWD) (Bright Futures for Kids with Disabilities). Amount of Funding: $529,081 over four years, 2009-2013.

Teucher, U. & Woodgate, R. L. Cancer and Young Adults: Making Sense of Illness. Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Research Grant. Amount of Funding: $83, 961.00 in total for three years, 2009 – 2012.

Medved, M. (PI), Rogers, K., & Woodgate, R. L. Decision-making in the acquired brain
injury triad: Perspectives of persons with acquired brain injury, their families, and professionals. Manitoba Medical Service Foundation (MMSF) research grant. Amount of Funding: $25,000.00 (Total) for 2009 – 2010.

Woodgate, R. L. (PI), Edwards, M., Lane, M.,Goldberg, A., Wener, P., & McDonald, P. Youth involvement in health care decisions: Ethical, social, and cultural perspectives. Manitoba Health Research Council Award. Amount of Funding: $50,000.00 (Total) for 2009 – 2010.

Woodgate, R. L. (PI), Edwards, M., Lane, M.,Goldberg, A., Wener, P., & McDonald, P. Youth involvement in health care decisions: Ethical, social, and cultural perspectives. Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) operating grant. Amount of Funding: $95,853.00 (Total) for 2008 – 2010.

Woodgate, R. L. (PI), Hallman, B., Ripat, J., Borton, B., Rempel, G., & Edwards, M.
Changing geographies of care: Using therapeutic landscapes as a framework to understand how families with medically complex children participate in communities. Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) operating grant. Amount of Funding: total-$252,327.00, 2008 – 2012.

Woodgate, R. L. (PI), Rempel, G., Ripat, J., Borton, B., Elias, B., Moffat, M., & Halas, J. Understanding the Disability Trajectory of First Nations Families of Children with disabilities: Advancing Jordan’s Principle. Canadian Institutes of Health Research Emerging Team Grant: Children with Disabilities (ETG: CWD) (Bright Futures for Kids with Disabilities): Letter of Intent. Amount of Funding: $10,000.00 for one year, 2008-2009.

Woodgate, R. (PI), Halas, J. & Schultz, A. An ethnographic study of adolescents’
conceptualization of cancer and cancer prevention: Framing cancer and cancer prevention within the life-situations of adolescents. Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) operating grant. Amount of Funding: $355,266.00 (Total), 2007 – 2012.

Woodgate, R. (PI). Youth speaking for themselves about health within their own life
situations: An ethnographic study of youth’s perspectives of health and their own health interests. Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Research Grant. Amount of Funding: $60,000.00 in total for three years, 2007 – 2010.

Woodgate, R. (PI), Halas, J. & Schultz, A. An ethnographic study of adolescents’
conceptualization of cancer and cancer prevention: Framing cancer and cancer prevention within the life-situations of adolescents. Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)- Manitoba Regional Partnership Program (RPP) Funding. Amount of Funding: $85,828.00 per year for one year, 2008 – 2009.

Woodgate, R. (PI), Halas, J. & Schultz, A. An ethnographic study of adolescents’
conceptualization of cancer and cancer prevention: Framing cancer and cancer prevention within the life-situations of adolescents. Canadian Institutes of Health Research – CIHR Operating Grant. Amount of Funding: $84,373.00 per year for one year, 2007 – 2008.

McDonald, M. (Principal Investigator), McDonald, M. (PI), Owen, J, Pullman, D.,
Sampson, H.,Lavery, J. , Woodgate, R.L. et al. et al. Canadian network for the governance of ethical health research involving humans: Evidence, accountability and practice. CIHR Team Grant – Ethical, Legal and Social Issues (ELS) strategic initiative. Amount of Funding: $67, 824.00/year for three years (Total = $203,472.00) 2008 -2011.

Woodgate, R. (PI), Irani, P., Degner, L., Yanofsky, R., West, C., & Watters, C.
Development and testing of a computer video-game approach designed for self-assessment and management of meaning-centred symptom experiences by children with cancer. Canadian Institute of Health Research – CIHR Operating Grant. Amount of Funding: $132,888.00 per year (total=$531,552.00), 2006 – 2012.

Woodgate, R. (PI), Edwards, M., Dean, R., Shapiro, C., Grant, K., & Cham, B.
Perceptions and assessment of the risks to involving children in research: Perspectives of research ethics board members, child health researchers, and parents. *CIHR – RFA for Empirical and Conceptual Research on Ethical, Legal and Social Issues in Studies Involving Pregnant Women and Children. Amount of Funding: $92,095.00 per year for three years plus $4,250.00 in equipment, October 2005 – September 2008.

Woodgate, R. L. (PI), Development of an International Pediatric Oncology Research Network: Setting the Stage for International Collaborative Psychosocial-Behavioral Research, Canadian Institute of Health Research – CIHR International Opportunity Program: Development/Planning Grant, $24,992.00, March 2005-2006.

Woodgate, R. L. (PI), Sloan, J., & Yanofsky, R. Parents’ and children’s decisions and experiences in childhood cancer clinical trials. Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) Operating Grant, Support for the period of July 2004 – July 2007; Total Amount: $49,428.00.

McClement, S., Woodgate, R., & Chochinov, H. Involuntary weight loss in advanced
cancer: Patient and family member perspectives. CancerCare Manitoba Foundation Inc. Operating Grant, $14,335.00, July 1, 2004-June 30, 2005.

Woodgate, R. L. (PI), Yanofsky, R., Degner, L., & Irani, P. Development and validation
of a computer video-game for self-assessment of meaning-centred symptom experiences by children with cancer. CIHR/Regional Partnership Program Operating Grant, $134, 250.00, 2003-2005.

Chalmers, K., Heaman, M., & Woodgate, R. Interpretative evaluation of the Baby First program. Sponsored by the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, $46,000.00, 2002-2004.

Woodgate, R. (PI). Transition from curative to end of life care in children: Families’
experiences and personal meanings. University of Manitoba Research Grant Program for New Faculty, $4,000.00, 2002-2003.

Woodgate, R. (PI), Secco, L. & Ateah, C. The needs of families living with and caring for children with autism. St. Amant Centre: Sister Bertha Baumann Research Awards, $5,000.00, 2001-2003.

Woodgate, R. (PI) (2000 -2002). Living with depression: Adolescents’ experiences: A
phenomenological study. University of Manitoba Research Grants Program for New Faculty, $4,790.00, 2001.

Woodgate, R. (Co-PI) & Secco, L. (2000 – 2003). Use of computer informatics by pediatric nurses. Small Grants from Children’s Hospital Research Foundation, Winnipeg, Manitoba, $3,636.00, 2001.

Woodgate, R. (PI). The social support experiences of children with disabilities and
their families. The Rehabilitation Centre for Children Foundation’s Research Grant Program, Winnipeg, Manitoba, $20,000.00, 2000-2002.

Woodgate, R. (Co-PI) & McClement, S. Caring for Palliative Care Cancer Patients experiencing delirium: A nursing perspective. Research Grant from The Riverview Health Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, $7,500.00, 2000-2002.

Woodgate, R. (PI). The experience of dyspnea in children with lung disease: A
qualitative study. Research Grant from the Canadian Lung Association, $11,500.00, 1995-1997.

Woodgate, R. (PI). The experience of chronic illness in adolescents: A qualitative
study. Research Grant from the Health Sciences Centre Research Foundation, Winnipeg, Manitoba, $5,000.00, 1993-1995.